Edward hopper

Edward Hopper is the narrative character artist that, if it has already been a source of inspiration for filmmakers and one of the greatest representatives of the twentieth century, now it takes on another meaning of greater importance and related to the days that we have to live in the era of the coronavirus.

Their deserted cityscapes and their lonely figures They represent like no one those images of seeing a lot of people applaud from their windows, but with the sadness of being far from each other.

As some have already said, all now we are represented in Hopper’s painting. Distanced from one another like the woman in “Morning Sun” sitting on her bed looking out the window, or another from the window looking with the same expression.

Edward hopper

We can continue to describe many of his paintings as the lonely shop worker, a woman alone in a movie theater or people separated from each other at the tables in a restaurant. Scenes that represent one of the worst effects of this pandemic that is eradicating direct contact between people.

Edward hopper

It is precisely what Hopper teaches us in his pictorial works. A painter who was born in New York in 1882 and who made loneliness his life’s work. Hopper also leaves us with the answer that if our freedoms are taken away in modern times, only loneliness leaves us.

A loneliness that we are supposed to learn to value in proportion to embrace the company of someone we do not know, that gaze with strange eyes or that sudden embrace of someone who joins us without looking for anything other than the most human. Hopper gives us another look at his work in these times of coronavirus and a pandemic that has forced us to be in our house like the fort. Don’t miss this free course on Hopper from the Thyssen Museum.